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International Journal of Biomaterials
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 252531, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/252531
Research Article

Systemic siRNA Delivery via Peptide-Tagged Polymeric Nanoparticles, Targeting PLK1 Gene in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Colorectal Cancer

1Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, 3775 University Street, Room 311, Lyman Duff Medical Building, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4
2Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, 3775 University Street, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B2

Received 17 June 2013; Accepted 7 August 2013

Academic Editor: Chwee Teck Lim

Copyright © 2013 Meenakshi Malhotra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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