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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 975832, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/975832
Review Article

From Prion Diseases to Prion-Like Propagation Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Diseases

1Université Montpellier 2, 34095 Montpellier, France
2Inserm, U710, 34095 Montpellier, France
3EPHE, 75007 Paris, France

Received 17 May 2013; Revised 5 September 2013; Accepted 5 September 2013

Academic Editor: Roberto Chiesa

Copyright © 2013 Isabelle Acquatella Tran Van Ba et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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