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International Journal of Chemical Engineering
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 898742, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/898742
Research Article

Chemical Kinetic Study of Nitrogen Oxides Formation Trends in Biodiesel Combustion

1Department of Applied Mechanics, Chalmers University of Technology, 412-96 Göteborg, Sweden
2CMT-Motores Térmicos, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia, Spain

Received 6 December 2011; Accepted 28 February 2012

Academic Editor: Mahesh T. Dhotre

Copyright © 2012 Junfeng Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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