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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 785247, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/785247
Research Article

The Effect of Captopril on Impaired Wound Healing in Experimental Diabetes

1Physiology Research Center, Department of Physiology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2Isfahan Medical Student Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3Department of Physiology, Isfahan Payame Noor University, Isfahan, Iran

Received 30 January 2012; Revised 25 April 2012; Accepted 25 May 2012

Academic Editor: Leon Bach

Copyright © 2012 Ehsan Zandifar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We aimed to investigate whether oral administration of captopril modulate wound healing, nitric oxide (NO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentration in wound fluid of diabetic rats. 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided in four groups ( ). The 36 rats were rendered diabetic by streptozotocin. The animals of the first and second groups received 25 and 50 mg/kg/day captopril, respectively, (DM-cap25 and DM-cap50). The animals of the third group were treated by distilled water (DM-control). Control rats had no intervention. The wound fluid level of NO and VEGF were measured. Wound specimens were investigated histopathologically. At the 5th day, there was significantly more in wound fluid of DM-cap25 compared to other groups. At the 7th day, both captopril-treated groups had more in wound fluid compared to other groups. At the 11th day, both captopril-treated groups had more in wound fluid compared to DM-control group. VEGF concentration was significantly higher in both captopril-treated groups versus DM-control group ( ). There were significant higher wound healing scores in captopril-treated groups compared with DM-control group ( ). These results suggest that captopril might be useful in diabetic wound healing.