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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 197519, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/197519
Clinical Study

Association between Osteocalcin, Metabolic Syndrome, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Role of Total and Undercarboxylated Osteocalcin in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

1Obesity Research Center, College of Medicine, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2925 (98), Riyadh 11461, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2925 (38), Riyadh 11461, Saudi Arabia
3Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2925, Riyadh 11461, Saudi Arabia
4Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA

Received 5 December 2012; Revised 13 March 2013; Accepted 13 March 2013

Academic Editor: Mario Maggi

Copyright © 2013 Assim A. Alfadda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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