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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 510703, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/510703
Clinical Study

Correlation of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Serum Levels and White Blood Cells Gene Expression of Nuclear Receptors in a Population of Infertile Women

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecological Sciences and Urological Sciences, University of Rome “Sapienza”, S. Andrea Hospital, Via di Grottarossa 1035, 00189 Rome, Italy
2Department of Woman Health and Territory's Medicine, University of Rome “Sapienza”, S. Andrea Hospital, Via di Grottarossa 1035, 00189 Rome, Italy
3Department of Environmental Sciences “G. Sarfatti”, University of Siena, Via P.A. Mattioli 4, 53100 Siena, Italy
4Department of Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health, Food and Veterinary Toxicology Unit, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy
5Department of Biomedical Sciences and Advanced Therapies, Section of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Ferrara, Corso Giovecca 203, 44121 Ferrara, Italy

Received 18 December 2012; Revised 2 April 2013; Accepted 3 April 2013

Academic Editor: Ewa Gregoraszczuk

Copyright © 2013 Donatella Caserta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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