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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 601246, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/601246
Review Article

Small-Molecule Hormones: Molecular Mechanisms of Action

1Department of Human Epigenetics, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, 5 Pawinskiego Street, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland
2Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Medical Center of Postgraduate Education, 61/63 Kleczewska Street, 01-826 Warsaw, Poland

Received 28 August 2012; Revised 30 December 2012; Accepted 17 January 2013

Academic Editor: A. L. Barkan

Copyright © 2013 Monika Puzianowska-Kuznicka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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