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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 803171, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/803171
Review Article

Cellular Signaling Pathway Alterations and Potential Targeted Therapies for Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

1Department of Pathology, Centro Oncologico Fiorentino, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze, Italy
2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa School of Medicine, 56100 Pisa, Italy
3Translational Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Istituto Toscano Tumori, 59100 Prato, Italy

Received 12 November 2012; Revised 8 January 2013; Accepted 10 January 2013

Academic Editor: Eleonore Fröhlich

Copyright © 2013 Serena Giunti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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