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International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 938308, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/938308
Research Article

Functional Diversification of Fungal Glutathione Transferases from the Ure2p Class

1Unité Mixte de Recherches INRA UHP 1136 Interaction Arbres Microorganismes, IFR 110 Ecosystèmes Forestiers, Agroressources, Bioprocédés et Alimentation, Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, Nancy Université BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France
2Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia
3Laboratoire des Interactions Microorganismes-Minéraux-Matière Organique dans les Sols, UMR 7137 CNRS—UHP, Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, Nancy Université BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France

Received 30 June 2011; Revised 12 August 2011; Accepted 5 September 2011

Academic Editor: Olga C. Nunes

Copyright © 2011 Anne Thuillier et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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