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International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 418964, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/418964
Review Article

The Role of Reticulate Evolution in Creating Innovation and Complexity

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3125, USA

Received 3 February 2012; Revised 8 May 2012; Accepted 10 May 2012

Academic Editor: Wen Wang

Copyright © 2012 Kristen S. Swithers et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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