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International Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 548081, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/548081
Research Article

Investigating the Relationship between Topology and Evolution in a Dynamic Nematode Odor Genetic Network

1Genome Evolution Laboratory, Department of Biology, National University of Ireland Maynooth, Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland
2Department of Biological Sciences, The George Washington University, 333 Lisner Hall, 2023 G Street NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
3Institute for Neuroscience, The George Washington University, 636 Ross Hall, 2300 I Street NW, Washington, DC 20037, USA

Received 17 May 2012; Revised 6 August 2012; Accepted 29 August 2012

Academic Editor: Amitabh Joshi

Copyright © 2012 David A. Fitzpatrick and Damien M. O'Halloran. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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