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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 942847, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/942847
Review Article

Sympatric Speciation in Threespine Stickleback: Why Not?

Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Section of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, One University Station C0930, Austin, TX 78712, USA

Received 3 May 2011; Accepted 25 June 2011

Academic Editor: Andrew Hendry

Copyright © 2011 Daniel I. Bolnick. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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