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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 108752, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/108752
Research Article

Modeling Impacts of Climate Change on Giant Panda Habitat

1Conservation Ecology Center, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park, Front Royal, VA 22630, USA
2Geography Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA

Received 14 September 2011; Accepted 19 December 2011

Academic Editor: A. E. Lugo

Copyright © 2012 Melissa Songer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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