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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 178348, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/178348
Research Article

Bone Accumulations of Spotted Hyaenas (Crocuta crocuta, Erxleben, 1777) as Indicators of Diet and Human Conflict; Mashatu, Botswana

Institute for Human Evolution, School of Geosciences, University of the Witwatersrand (WITS), Johannesburg 2050, South Africa

Received 18 November 2011; Revised 2 March 2012; Accepted 2 March 2012

Academic Editor: Bruce Leopold

Copyright © 2012 Brian F. Kuhn. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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