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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 242154, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/242154
Research Article

Larval Performance in the Context of Ecological Diversification and Speciation in Lycaeides Butterflies

1Department of Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA
2Department of Biology, Population and Conservation Biology Program, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA
3Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
4Department of Botany, Program in Ecology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA

Received 26 July 2011; Accepted 29 November 2011

Academic Editor: Rui Faria

Copyright © 2012 Cynthia F. Scholl et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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