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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 250352, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/250352
Research Article

Interactions between a Top Order Predator and Exotic Mesopredators in the Australian Rangelands

1School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005. Arid Recovery, P.O. Box 147, Roxby Downs, South Australia 5725, Australia
2Arid Recovery, P.O. Box 147, Roxby Downs, SA 5725, Australia

Received 4 August 2011; Accepted 27 September 2011

Academic Editor: Cajo J. F. ter Braak

Copyright © 2012 Katherine E. Moseby et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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