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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 256017, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/256017
Review Article

Underappreciated Consequences of Phenotypic Plasticity for Ecological Speciation

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA

Received 25 July 2011; Revised 22 October 2011; Accepted 12 December 2011

Academic Editor: Andrew Hendry

Copyright © 2012 Benjamin M. Fitzpatrick. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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