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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 280169, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/280169
Review Article

The Role of Parasitism in Adaptive Radiations—When Might Parasites Promote and When Might They Constrain Ecological Speciation?

1Department of Biological and Environmental Science, Centre of Excellence in Evolutionary Research, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014, Finland
2Department of Fish Ecology and Evolution, Eawag: Centre of Ecology, Evolution and Biogeochemistry, Seestrasse 79, 6047 Kastanienbaum, Switzerland
3Division of Aquatic Ecology & Macroevolution, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Bern, Baltzerstrasse 6, 3012 Bern, Switzerland

Received 16 August 2011; Revised 28 November 2011; Accepted 2 January 2012

Academic Editor: Andrew Hendry

Copyright © 2012 Anssi Karvonen and Ole Seehausen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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