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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 508458, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/508458
Review Article

From Local Adaptation to Speciation: Specialization and Reinforcement

CEFE-UMR 5175, 1919 Route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier Cedex 5, France

Received 29 July 2011; Revised 21 November 2011; Accepted 12 December 2011

Academic Editor: Marianne Elias

Copyright © 2012 Thomas Lenormand. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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