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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 539109, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/539109
Research Article

Simulating Pattern-Process Relationships to Validate Landscape Genetic Models

1Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington, Box 355672, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
2Rocky Mountain Research Station, United States Forest Service, Missoula, MT 59808, USA
3Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA

Received 28 September 2011; Accepted 6 January 2012

Academic Editor: Daniel Rubenstein

Copyright © 2012 A. J. Shirk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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