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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 902438, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/902438
Research Article

Divergent Selection and Then What Not: The Conundrum of Missing Reproductive Isolation in Misty Lake and Stream Stickleback

1Redpath Museum and Department of Biology, McGill University, 859 Sherbrooke Street. W, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2K6
2Department of Aquatic Ecology, Eawag and ETH-Zurich, Institute of Integrative Biology, Ueberlandstraβe 133, 8600 Duebendorf, Switzerland
3Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 6N5

Received 1 July 2011; Accepted 28 October 2011

Academic Editor: Rui Faria

Copyright © 2012 Katja Räsänen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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