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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 939862, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/939862
Review Article

Parallel Ecological Speciation in Plants?

1Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, 3529-6270 University Boulevard, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
2Biology Department, Indiana University, 1001 E Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA

Received 3 August 2011; Revised 14 October 2011; Accepted 18 November 2011

Academic Editor: Andrew Hendry

Copyright © 2012 Katherine L. Ostevik et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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