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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 536524, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/536524
Research Article

Fragmentation of the Southern Brown Bandicoot Isoodon obesulus: Unraveling Past Climate Change from Vegetation Clearing

1School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australian Defence Force Academy, Northcott Drive, Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia
2Planning and Assessment Team, Parks and Wildlife Group, Office of Environment & Heritage, Southern Ranges Region, P.O. Box 733, Queanbeyan, NSW 2620, Australia

Received 8 August 2012; Accepted 27 November 2012

Academic Editor: Bruce Leopold

Copyright © 2013 David J. Paull et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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