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International Journal of Ecology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 712537, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/712537
Review Article

Understanding the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle: An Ecohydrological Perspective

Unité d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Physique de la Environnement (EPHYSE, UR 1263), L'Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Centre INRA Bordeaux, Aquitaine, 71 Avenue Edouard Bourlaux, 33140 Villenave d'Ornon, France

Received 23 July 2013; Revised 9 November 2013; Accepted 18 December 2013; Published 4 March 2014

Academic Editor: Ram C. Sihag

Copyright © 2014 Ajit Govind and Jyothi Kumari. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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