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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 298674, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/298674
Research Article

Effects of Landform on Site Index for Two Mesophytic Tree Species in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina, USA

Southern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 1577 Brevard Road, Asheville, NC 28806, USA

Received 9 July 2009; Accepted 9 December 2009

Academic Editor: Hamish Kimmins

Copyright © 2010 W. Henry McNab. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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