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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 401951, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/401951
Research Article

Documentation of Significant Losses in Cornus florida L. Populations throughout the Appalachian Ecoregion

Forest Resource Analysts, USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis, 4700 Old Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN 37919, USA

Received 17 June 2009; Revised 15 October 2009; Accepted 19 January 2010

Academic Editor: Terry L. Sharik

Copyright © 2010 Christopher M. Oswalt and Sonja N. Oswalt. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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