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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 438930, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/438930
Research Article

Physiological Effects of Smoke Exposure on Deciduous and Conifer Tree Species

1Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
2Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA

Received 1 July 2009; Revised 6 December 2009; Accepted 1 February 2010

Academic Editor: Terry L. Sharik

Copyright © 2010 W. John Calder et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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