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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 170974, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/170974
Research Article

The Effects of Selective Logging Behaviors on Forest Fragmentation and Recovery

1Percy FitzPatrick Institute, DST-NRF Centre of Excellence, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town 7701, South Africa
2Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
3School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
4Department of Geography, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA

Received 10 February 2012; Revised 10 May 2012; Accepted 11 May 2012

Academic Editor: Todd S. Fredericksen

Copyright © 2012 Xanic J. Rondon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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