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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 193975, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/193975
Research Article

Inconsistent Growth Response to Fertilization and Thinning of Lodgepole Pine in the Rocky Mountain Foothills Is Linked to Site Index

1Alberta School of Forest Science and Management, Faculty of Agricultural Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2H1
2Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, 5320 122 Street, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6H 3S5

Received 20 July 2012; Accepted 13 October 2012

Academic Editor: John Sessions

Copyright © 2012 Bradley D. Pinno et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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