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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 529197, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/529197
Research Article

Trends in Snag Populations in Drought-Stressed Mixed-Conifer and Ponderosa Pine Forests (1997–2007)

Rocky Mountain Research Station, US Forest Service, 2500 S. Pine Knoll, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, USA

Received 16 June 2011; Revised 16 November 2011; Accepted 6 December 2011

Academic Editor: Andrew Gray

Copyright © 2012 Joseph L. Ganey and Scott C. Vojta. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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