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International Journal of Forestry Research
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 657846, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/657846
Research Article

Diversity of Perceptions on REDD+ Implementation at the Agriculture Frontier in Panama

1Department of Biology, McGill University, 1205 Doctor Penfield Avenue, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1B1
2Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Ancon, Panama
3Centre D'étude de la Forêt, Case Postale 8888, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC, Canada H3C 3P8
4Faculté de Foresterie, de Géographie et de Géomatique, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada G1K 7P4

Received 30 July 2012; Accepted 21 December 2012

Academic Editor: Damase Khasa

Copyright © 2013 Guillaume Peterson St-Laurent et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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