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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 914762, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/914762
Research Article

Comparative Analyses of Transcriptional Profiles in Mouse Organs Using a Pneumonic Plague Model after Infection with Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant

1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-1070, USA
2Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Polytechnic and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA

Received 26 July 2009; Revised 28 September 2009; Accepted 18 October 2009

Academic Editor: Antoine Danchin

Copyright © 2009 Cristi L. Galindo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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