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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 129416, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/129416
Research Article

High Levels of Sequence Diversity in the 5′ UTRs of Human-Specific L1 Elements

1Department of Nanobiomedical Science & WCU Research Center, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714, Republic of Korea
2Department of Microbiology, College of Advance Science, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714, Republic of Korea
3Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA

Received 29 July 2011; Revised 25 October 2011; Accepted 31 October 2011

Academic Editor: Brian Wigdahl

Copyright © 2012 Jungnam Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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