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Comparative and Functional Genomics
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 362104, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/362104
Research Article

Evolution and Conservation of Predicted Inclusion Membrane Proteins in Chlamydiae

1Host-Parasite Interactions Section, Laboratory of Intracellular Parasites, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
2Research Technologies Branch, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA

Received 21 September 2011; Accepted 30 November 2011

Academic Editor: Shen Liang Chen

Copyright © 2012 Erika I. Lutter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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