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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 273120, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/273120
Review Article

Community-Based Participatory Research Approaches for Hypertension Control and Prevention in Churches

Center for Post Polio Rehabilitation, 2308 W, 127 Street, Leawood, KS 66209, USA

Received 23 March 2011; Accepted 12 April 2011

Academic Editor: Samy I. McFarlane

Copyright © 2011 Sunita Dodani. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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