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International Journal of Hypertension
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 685238, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/685238
Review Article

Role of the Renin-Angiotensin System and Aldosterone on Cardiometabolic Syndrome

Unidad clínico-experimental de Riesgo Vascular (UCERV-UCAMI), IBIS. Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, SAS, Universidad de Sevilla, CSIC Avenida, 41011 Sevilla, Spain

Received 31 December 2010; Revised 24 March 2011; Accepted 29 April 2011

Academic Editor: Vanessa Ronconi

Copyright © 2011 P. Stiefel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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