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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 823710, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/823710
Review Article

Peyer's Patches: The Immune Sensors of the Intestine

1UMR843 INSERM, Université Sorbonne Paris Cité-Diderot, Hôpital Robert Debré, 75019 Paris, France
2Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Robert Debré, 75019 Paris, France

Received 30 May 2010; Accepted 11 July 2010

Academic Editor: Gerhard Rogler

Copyright © 2010 Camille Jung et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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