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International Journal of Inflammation
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 231926, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/231926
Review Article

Definition of Nonresponse to Analgesic Treatment of Arthritic Pain: An Analytical Literature Review of the Smallest Detectable Difference, the Minimal Detectable Change, and the Minimal Clinically Important Difference on the Pain Visual Analog Scale

1Scribco Pharmaceutical Writing, P.O. Box 1525, Blue Bell, PA 19422, USA
2Departments of Global Health Outcomes, Epidemiology, and Clinical Development, Merck & Co., Inc., One Merck Drive, Whitehouse Station, NJ 08889, USA

Received 25 January 2011; Accepted 8 March 2011

Academic Editor: Bernhard Rintelen

Copyright © 2011 Melissa E. Stauffer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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