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International Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 793260, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/793260
Review Article

Recent Pharmacological Developments on Rhodanines and 2,4-Thiazolidinediones

1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Drug Research, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002, India
2Department of Chemistry, Punjabi University, Punjab, Patiala 147 002, India

Received 30 November 2012; Revised 12 March 2013; Accepted 25 March 2013

Academic Editor: Maria Cristina Breschi

Copyright © 2013 Ravinder Singh Bhatti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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