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International Journal of Molecular Imaging
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 817682, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/817682
Review Article

Stroma Targeting Nuclear Imaging and Radiopharmaceuticals

1Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive, C5008, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
3Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110744, Republic of Korea

Received 4 January 2012; Accepted 29 February 2012

Academic Editor: Izabela Tworowska

Copyright © 2012 Dinesh Shetty et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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