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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 152815, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/152815
Review Article

Prominent Human Health Impacts from Several Marine Microbes: History, Ecology, and Public Health Implications

1Center for Oceans and Human Health, Pacific Research Center for Marine Biomedicine, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, MSB no. 205, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA
2Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Cswy, Miami, FL 33149, USA
3Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
4Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida and University of Miami Center for Oceans and Human Health, Key Biscayne, FL 33124-0630, USA
5Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California and University of Hawaii Center for Oceans and Human Health, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
6National Center for Environmental Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47770 Buford Highway NE MS F-46, Chamblee, GA 30341, USA

Received 15 June 2010; Revised 23 July 2010; Accepted 25 July 2010

Academic Editor: Max Teplitski

Copyright © 2011 P. K. Bienfang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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