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International Journal of Nephrology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 392708, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/392708
Review Article

The Role of Salt in the Pathogenesis of Fructose-Induced Hypertension

1The Center on Genetics of Transport and Epithelial Biology, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, MSB 6312, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0585, USA
2Research Services, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45220, USA
3Department of Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, MSB 6312, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0585, USA
4Pennsylvania Hospital, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

Received 19 January 2011; Revised 14 April 2011; Accepted 30 April 2011

Academic Editor: Anil K. Agarwal

Copyright © 2011 Manoocher Soleimani and Pooneh Alborzi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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