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International Journal of Pediatrics
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 467918, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/467918
Research Article

Assessing Latent Effects of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure on Growth and Risk of Cardiometabolic Disease in Late Adolescence: Design and Methods

1Division of Pediatric Clinical Research, Department of Pediatrics, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33130, USA
2Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33130, USA
3Division of Clinical Research, Department of Pediatrics, Batchelor Children’s Research Institute, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, 1580 NW 10th Avenue (D820), Miami, FL 33101, USA
4Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33130, USA
5Division of Pediatric Psychology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33130, USA

Received 13 July 2012; Accepted 27 September 2012

Academic Editor: Namik Yaşar Özbek

Copyright © 2012 Sarah E. Messiah et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Prenatal cocaine exposure has been linked to neurocognitive and developmental outcomes throughout childhood. The cardiovascular toxicity of cocaine is also markedly increased in pregnancy, but it is unknown whether this toxicity affects anthropometric growth and the development of cardiometabolic disease risk factors in the offspring across the lifespan. During the early 1990s, the Miami Prenatal Cocaine Study enrolled a cohort of 476 African American children (253 cocaine-exposed, 223 non-cocaine-exposed) and their biological mothers at delivery in a prospective, longitudinal study. The MPCS has collected 12 prior waves of multidomain data on over 400 infants and their mothers/alternate caregivers through mid-adolescence and is now embarking on an additional wave of data collection at ages 18-19 years. We describe here the analytical methods for examining the relationship between prenatal cocaine exposure, anthropometric growth, and cardiometabolic disease risk factors in late adolescence in this minority, urban cohort. Findings from this investigation should inform both the fields of substance use and cardiovascular research about subsequent risks of cocaine ingestion during pregnancy in offspring.