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International Journal of Pediatrics
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 473541, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/473541
Review Article

The Prevention of Noise Induced Hearing Loss in Children

Auditory Science Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of Toronto and The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X8

Received 11 June 2012; Revised 14 November 2012; Accepted 16 November 2012

Academic Editor: Joel R. Rosh

Copyright © 2012 Robert V. Harrison. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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