Table 3: Comparison of complications in different studies on pediatric procedural sedation.

Studies ProceduresMean age ± SD (yr) (min–max)Described complication% found in each studyEquivalent % in our cohort

Sury et al., 1999 [3]1155MRIN/AFailure52.3

Beebe et al., 2000 [9]572MRI
(2 mo–14 yo)
Inadequate sedation7.97.3

Total20.122

Malviya et al., 1997 [1]1140MRI (48%)
CT (27%)
Cardiac (22%)
Inadequate sedation
Failure
Desaturation ≤90%
13.2
3.78
5.5
8
2.3
5.77

Total6.5222

Lightdale et al., 2009 [11]5045Imaging (81%)3.3 (1.4–6.4)Serious adverse events*
Failure
Desaturation§
1.92
1.17
0.57
0
2.3
0

Haque and Fadoo, 2010 [12]499Oncology4.2 (6 mo–14 yo)Desaturation¥
Apnea
2.4
0.6
5.77
0

Cravero et al., 2006 [13]30037Imaging (60%)
Oncology (9%)
GI (6%)
0–6 mo : 6%
6 mo–2 yo : 23%
2–8 yo : 47%
8 yo+ : 29%
Desaturation ≤90%
Apnea
1.57
0.24
5.77
0

Cravero et al., 2009 [10]49836Imaging (60%)
Oncology (14%)
GI (11%)
0–6 mo : 2%
6–12 mo : 6%
1-2 yo : 12%
2–4 yo : 21%
4–8 yo : 28%
8 yo+ : 29%
Desaturation ≤90% for 30 s
Apnea
1.54
5.75
5.77
0

Lavoie, 2012448Imaging (41%) GI (10%) (1 mo–18 yo)Failure
Desaturation ≤90%
Apnea
Major complication
2.3
5.77
0
0




*Serious adverse effects define as allergic reaction, aspiration, cardiovascular complications, need for resuscitation, unplanned admission, use of reversal agents, abnormal SpO2, prolonged sedation, and paradoxical reaction.
§Desaturation defines as a sustained drop in oxygen saturation 5% from baseline for more than 1 minute and unresponsive to blow-by oxygen at 6 L/min, and/or head repositioning, suctioning, or stimulation.
¥Transient desaturation which was improved by head repositioning and increasing oxygen flow.