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International Journal of Pediatrics
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 891094, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/891094
Review Article

The Effects of Hypertension on Cognitive Function in Children and Adolescents

1Pediatric Nephrology, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH 43205, USA
2The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

Received 14 October 2011; Revised 9 December 2011; Accepted 12 December 2011

Academic Editor: Esra Baskin

Copyright © 2012 Stephen D. Cha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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