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International Journal of Pediatrics
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 191643, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/191643
Research Article

The Relation between Helicobacter pylori Infection and Acute Bacterial Diarrhea in Children

1Clinical and Surgical Pathology, Department of Pathology, Children Medical Center Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14161351, Iran
2Pediatric Infectious Disease Research Center, Children Medical Center Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14161351, Iran
3Department of Pathology, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran 1439665663, Iran
4Department of Pathology, Children Medical Center Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran 14161351, Iran
5Department of Gastroenterology, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran 1419733141, Iran
6Children Medical Center Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14161351, Iran

Received 31 October 2013; Revised 11 January 2014; Accepted 12 January 2014; Published 19 February 2014

Academic Editor: Alessandro Mussa

Copyright © 2014 Maryam Monajemzadeh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. H. pylori infection leads to chronic gastritis in both children and adults. But recently, there are arising theories of its protective effect in diarrheal diseases. Aim. To explore the prevalence of H. pylori infection in children with bacterial diarrhea and compare it with healthy controls. Patients and Methods. Two matched groups consisted of 122 consecutive children, aged 24–72 months old, with acute bacterial diarrhea, who had Shigellosis ( ) and Salmonellosis ( ) as patients group and 204 healthy asymptomatic children as control group enrolled in this study. Results. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in healthy control children was significantly higher than in patients group, (odds ratio = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.33–9.5, ). In our study, only 2/54 Salmonella infected patients and 3/68 of Shigellosis had evidence of H. pylori infection, while normal control children had 27/204 infected individuals. Conclusion. H. pylori infection may play a protective role against bacterial diarrhea in children. So it is important to consider all of the positive and negative aspects of H. pylori infection before its eradication.