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International Journal of Peptides
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 328140, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/328140
Research Article

Amyloid Beta Peptides Differentially Affect Hippocampal Theta Rhythms In Vitro

1Departamento de Neurobiología del Desarrollo y Neurofisiología, Instituto de Neurobiología, UNAM, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, 16230 Querétaro, Mexico
2Departamento de Farmacobiología, Cinvestav-IPN, Calzada de los Tenorios 235, Col. Granjas Coapa, 14330 México, DF, Mexico

Received 24 March 2013; Accepted 3 June 2013

Academic Editor: John D. Wade

Copyright © 2013 Armando I. Gutiérrez-Lerma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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