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International Journal of Plant Genomics
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 957602, 30 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/957602
Review Article

Advances in Maize Genomics and Their Value for Enhancing Genetic Gains from Breeding

1International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Apdo. Postal 6-64, 06600 Mexico, DF, Mexico
2Maize Research Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya'an, Sichuan 625014, China
3USDA-ARS-CHPRRU, Box 9555, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA

Received 15 December 2008; Accepted 27 May 2009

Academic Editor: Sylvie Cloutier

Copyright © 2009 Yunbi Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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