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International Journal of Plant Genomics
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 874743, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/874743
Research Article

Evolutionary History of LTR Retrotransposon Chromodomains in Plants

1Laboratory of Molecular Genetic Systems, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia
2Department of Natural Sciences, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia
3Department of Plant Pathology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546, USA
4Department of Biological Sciences, University at Albany, Life Sciences Building 2061, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222, USA

Received 15 September 2011; Revised 27 January 2012; Accepted 12 February 2012

Academic Editor: Jim Leebens-Mack

Copyright © 2012 Anton Novikov et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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